English Courses (ENG)

ENG-100.2   College Writing 3 credits

Prerequisites: Placement

A course in the essential elements of critical thinking and rhetorical strategies necessary for effective college writing. The course emphasizes writing as process and focuses extensively on revision. Students whose native language is English and who are enrolled in ENG-100.2 are encouraged to enroll in STS-110, Effective Studying. Students whose native language is not English may be required to do work in English as a Second Language (MFL-101, 102) while enrolled in ENG-100.2.

ENG-218.1   Poetry Writing Workshop 3 credits

Prerequisites: Permission

In this workshop students will both study examples of and write various kinds of poetry, such as lyric, narrative, dramatic, and prose poems. Students will critique the work of their classmates and analyze that of published authors, who may include Anne Carson, Pablo Neruda, C.D. Wright, Mary Oliver, Antonio Machado, and Billy Collins. Special emphasis will be given to studying the forms and strategies of poetry, critically responding to others' work and generating and revising one's own work.

ENG-219.1   Fiction Writing Workshop 3 credits

Prerequisites: Permission

In this workshop students will write short stories and study contemporary novels, comic books, and short narratives. Students will critique the work of their classmates and analyze that of published authors, who may include Michael Ondaatje, Zadie Smith, Arundhati Roy and David Foster Wallace. Special emphasis will be given to studying the forms and strategies of fiction, critically responding to others' work, and generating and revising one's own work.

ENG-220.1   Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop 3 credits

Prerequisites: Permission

In this workshop students will both study examples of and write various kinds of creative nonfiction, such as memoir, travel writing, nature writing, cultural criticism, and literary journalism. Students will read the work of their classmates as well as that of published authors, who may include Tom Wolfe, Annie Dillard, Rebecca Solnit, Kim Barnes, and John McPhee. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the forms and strategies of creative nonfiction, critically responding to others' work, and generating and revising one's own work.

ENG-280   Theory & Methods of the Study of Literature 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101 and ENG-299T

By introducing major movements and theories informing scholarly studies in literature, this course helps prepare serious students of literature for advanced study and research in the field. Students explore and apply major 20th-century literary theories, thereby observing both how literature lends itself to different forms of interpretation and how the formal study of literature has changed over time. Students also write a substantial literary analysis grounded in literary-theoretical approaches. Topics of discussion may include new criticism, structuralism, psychoanalytic criticism, Marxism, deconstruction, post-structuralism, gender studies, new formalism, race and ethnic studies, cultural studies, queer theory, new historicism, postcolonial theory, phenomenology, and ecocriticism. This course is intended for majors in Creative Writing and Literature in English and highly recommended for those intending to pursue graduate studies in English.

ENG-294   Independent Study 1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites: Permission and ENG-101, WRI-102, or FYS-101

A special research project on a selected topic. Independent studies cannot substitute for specific course requirements in the major or minor. See independent study guidelines.

ENG-299T   Special Topics 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

Specific topics are listed below.

ENG-299T.10   Shakespearean Comedy 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

This course will trace the development of Shakespearean comedy through representative plays from all stages of the dramatist's career. In the process, the class will explore the literary, theatrical, religious, political, and cultural significance of comedy, both in general and in its Shakespearean form.

ENG-299T.14   Weird Shakespeare 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

A study of Shakespeare nobody told you about. Students will approach some of the underexposed plays and poems on their own terms, rather than ignoring them, dismissing them as failures, or treating them as background for better known plays. Texts may range from the early Ovidian narratives Venus and Adonis and the Rape of Lucrece to the troubling plays of the middle period (like Troilus and Cressida, listed in different early versions as a comedy, a history, and a tragedy, or All's Well That Ends Well, one of the world's unhappiest comedies) to late experiments like the austere tragedy Coriolanus or the over-the-top Cymbeline.

ENG-299T.15   World War I & Modern Literature 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

World War I, the most literary war in British history, may well have permanently altered the landscape of British literature through its poetry and prose. This course will examine the war poets' verse; soldiers' and nurses' autobiographies; Virginia Woolf's modernist novel Mrs. Dalloway; T. S. Eliot's poem "The Waste Land"; and Pat Barker's recent novel Regeneration, the fictional account of the relationship between military psychiatrist William Rivers and shell-shocked poets Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen.

ENG-299T.19   Introduction to Shakespeare 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

Through careful scrutiny of representative plays in several genres and from different periods in Shakespeare's career, this course will test popular perceptions of English literature's most overexposed figure by situating him in his literary, theatrical, historical, and cultural contexts.

ENG-299T.21   Literature & Medicine 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

This course focuses on literature as a medium of empathy and explores such relationships as those between doctor and patient, mind and medicine, the scalpel and the act of poetry. Authors may include William Carlos Williams, Robert Coles, Franz Kafka, Anton Chekov, and Toni Morrison.

ENG-299T.22   The Literature of Motherhood 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

This course will critically examine various constructions of motherhood through close readings of literature written by both mothers and non-mothers. Authors may include Pattiann Rogers, Jane Smiley, Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, and Barbara Kingsolver.

ENG-299T.23   Asia through its Movies 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

Students will analyze contemporary Asian cultures through movies from Hong Kong, Japan, Vietnam, mainland China and the Indian subcontinent. Genres will include wu-xia, anime, sci-fi, musicals, yakuza narratives and "art house" movies. Course readings will include cultural studies theory, short stories, and the directors' and artists' essays and commentaries.

ENG-299T.25   Prose & Cons 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

One of the most extraordinary achievements of 20th- century American culture is the literature that has come out of the nation's prisons. While there have also been many eminent prison writers from other countries, such as John Donne, Maxim Gorky, and Dostoyevsky, modern American prison writings constitute what might be considered a coherent body of literature with a unique historical significance and cultural influence. Through careful examination of selected works of primarily American prison literature, this course investigates a vision of America from the bottom, an anatomy of the American prison, and an exploration of the meanings of imprisonment. Authors may include Malcom X, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Ken Lamberton, Agnes Smedley, and Nawal El Saadawi.

ENG-299T.26   Literature of the American West 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

What is the American West as imagined and depicted by 20th-century writers? Which mythologies and ideologies about the West (such as rugged individualism and the idea of the frontier) dating from the 19th-century are still present and perpetuated by contemporary authors? How do contemporary writers reject or revise such mythologies? How do individualism, counter-culturalism, racial difference, aridity, competition over natural resources, and environmentalism shape the way Americans imagine the West? How does the West in its conflicts, diversity, and complexity epitomize in a dramatic way what we imagine as deeply American? These are just some of the questions that we will attempt to answer through our reading of novels, short stories, poems and essays by 20th-century American westerners such as Wallace Stegner, Gretel Ehrlich, Ken Kesey, Leslie Marmon Silko, Edward Abbey, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Gary Snyder.

ENG-299T.27   Literature and Comedy 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

In this course we study the evolution and variety of comedy in literature, from classical Greece to contemporary United States. Along the way, we examine different comedic categories, such as the picaresque, absurdism, parody, satire, and black comedy in the work of authors such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Jonathan Swift, Henry Fielding, Oscar Wilde, Mark Twain, P.G. Wodehouse, and Flannery O'Connor. In each case, we examine the rhetoric of comedy: What makes a particular work funny? Why do we laugh? What are the motivations for comedy; when is it meant as "comic relief" from reality, and when is it meant as subversive critique of society?

ENG-299T.28   Asian Pop Culture 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

This course will critically examine contemporary Asian pop culture narratives defined by and representing the Rising Asia phenomenon of the past thirty years. Students will study Asian movies, manga (graphic novels), anime and television shows (drama and talk shows), all with special emphases on transnationalism, the cosmopolitan, and hyphenated identities in contemporary Asian cultures.

ENG-299T.29   Baggy Monsters and Friends: Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

Henry James famously called nineteenth-century novels "loose baggy monsters." But the Russian novels that inspired this comment - by Dostoevsky, Turgenev, and Tolstoy - are not only long, but also rich with insight into life and human nature. This course will focus on the most famous of the nineteenth-century Russian prose writers as well as writers who inspired them or joined the Russian conversation about history and society. Assignments will focus on close reading of text and interpretation of historical context.

ENG-299T.3   Money in Literature 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

Sampling several centuries, countries, and literary genres, this course traces the love-hate relationship between literary art and financial calculation, a relationship which raises questions regarding what has value and what doesn't, what is real and what isn't, what humans in society owe to one another, and what purpose artistic endeavor is supposed to serve in a world where such endeavor rarely pays.

ENG-299T.30   Literature & Landscapes 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

Classes on literature often cover the "setting"of a work, but what is the larger role that landscape plays for the meaning and structure of some novels? By reading works in which landscape plays a significant part in the author's writing, students in this course will interrogate what "place"and interaction with landscape means for human activity, emotion, and memory. Readings will include works by Ivo Andric, Vladimir Nabokov, Abd al-Rahman Munif, and V.S. Naipaul. Assignments will emphasize close reading of text and will include an independent reading project.

ENG-299T.32   Native American Fiction 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

This course will explore the last forty years of Native American and First Nations fiction. We will begin by examining the social climate of the late 1960s that surrounded the publication of N. Scott Momaday's Pulitzer-prize winning House Made of Dawn , the novel which signaled the beginning of the literary period known as the Native American Renaissance. Our survey will then take us forward to the present as we explore the adaptation of indigenous story traditions and conventions into contemporary novel forms in fiction which is funny, tragic, and suspenseful.

ENG-299T.33   The Literature of Slavery 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

This course focuses on the literary history of chattel slavery, particularly as it pertains to the United States, and on how slavery and its legacy have shaped--and functioned within--literary and cultural traditions. We will concentrate on the period of 1700-1861 in American literary history, and readings will include letters, poetry, fiction, and autobiographical narratives about the slavery experience, as well as various writings that both denounce and support the institution of slavery. As we will see, the literature of slavery and the issues it raises are both political and personal, both historical and contemporary.

ENG-299T.34   Postmodernism & Human Rights Activism 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

On December 10, 1948, the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, proclaiming "the advent of a world in which human beings shall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear"as "the highest aspiration of the common people[,]" that "disregard and contempt for human rights have resulted in barbarous acts" and "that every individual and every organ of society... shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms."Using the Declaration as a basis, this course explores post-World War II theories, fiction, poetry, and movies by formerly colonized and/or enslaved and historically oppressed indigenous peoples. This course will feature authors who violate literary forms and genres as a method of resistance and empowerment. Topics may include Arab nationalism, the Intifada, the Bangla Language Movement, the Cultural Revolution, and apartheid.

ENG-299T.35   The Literature of Immigrants 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

This course examines non-Western immigrant experiences in North America and Europe through fiction, poetry, personal memoir, and letters. Topics may include generational conflicts, hyphenated identity, racial discrimination, and immigrant rights. Along the way, we will explore the emergence of immigrant activism and the impacts of 20th-century wars, foreign policies, and immigration laws on domestic civil rights movements. Authors may include Michael Ondaatje, Jhumpa Lahri, Chang-Rae Lee, V. S. Naipaul, and Hari Kunzru.

ENG-299T.36   Old & New: Premodern Texts & Modern Responses 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

This course will pair influential premodern works with modern reworkings of them, as a way of thinking about how writers use the literature they inherit to stimulate new creation. Pairings may include Beowulf and John Gardner's Grendel, Malory's Morte D'Arthur and Walker Percy's Lancelot, Shakespeare's The Tempest and Aimé Césaire's A Tempest, some traditional folk tales and stories from Angela Carter's The Bloody Chamber, and selected short poems.

ENG-299T.4   Thief-making & Thief-taking: Nineteenth-century Crime Literature 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

The nineteenth century was immersed in the cultural project of defining criminality and, through the gradual professionalization of the police, constructing the criminal's nemesis, the detective. Through popular crime fiction, newspaper accounts of an actual criminal case, and articles from nineteenth-century periodicals, we will explore how the nineteenth-century fascination with crime and detectives was shaped by preoccupations with the construction of gender, class dynamics, and the tension between the didactic and entertainment functions of popular fiction. We will also turn the spotlight on ourselves, considering why we might sustain that fascination today and why mystery stories remain one of the most widely read genres. As we address these questions, we'll be making forays into interpretative strategies based on Marxist, cultural studies, psychoanalytic, and narrative literary theories. Texts include Charles Dickens' Newgate novel, Oliver Twist Wilkie Collins' sensation novel, Woman in White; selected short stories featuring the exploits of Sherlock Holmes; and at least one late twentieth-century text adopting and adapting the figure of Sherlock Holmes.

ENG-299T.9   Visions of Environment 3 credits

Prerequisites: FYS-101

This course focuses on writers who have shaped thinking about the environment in the United States. The course first examines the historical and philosophical bases for American conceptions of nature, and then analyzes literary treatments of concepts such as bioregionalism, wilderness, sense of place, and environmentalism. Authors include Henry David Thoreau, George Perkins Marsh, John Muir, Aldo Leopold, Rachel Carson, and others.

ENG-307   Origins & Traditions of English Literature 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

A survey of landmark poetry and prose from the Anglo-Saxon Era to the Enlightenment, with special emphasis on how the assumptions, concerns, and techniques of these texts came to be seen as the kernel of a coherent national literary tradition.

ENG-309   Constructing World Literatures 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

In order to see the picture, one must step out of the frame. In this course, students will step out of their own cultural frames by studying how and why genres, politics, trade/war, religion (and also how we ourselves) construct global culture and identity. The texts will provide not only vicarious experiences of lands and cultures but will also reflect the dialogic nature of specific cultural and cross-cultural literary traditions. Possible traditions covered may include those of the Ancient Near East, the Ottoman Empire, the Subcontinent, Mogul and Persian poetry, Greco-Roman culture, North Africa, Native America, and the Caribbean-African-Asian heritage.

ENG-310   Inventing America 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

This course explores the making of "America" (focusing primarily on the United States) through literature, from the age of discovery through the post-Revolutionary period. Our primary purposes is to explore the means by which settlement and national identity were invented through language. Our texts feature a range of "literature," including transcribed Native American oral stories, colonial promotional tracts, sermons, speeches, captivity narratives, political pamphlets, personal letters, and slave narratives. The class will explore personal and cultural issues that concerned early Americans and discuss how texts both define and complicate some of the terms associated with the literature of this period, including "colonist," "Puritan," "Enlightenment," "liberty," and even "America" itself.

ENG-311   Ghosties & Ghoulies & Long-Leggedy Beasties: The Supernatural in British Literature 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

By examining the specters that have haunted the last two hundred years of British fiction, this course will explore the applicability of the supernatural as a vehicle for expressing transgressions against cultural and literary conventions. Canonical and non-canonical authors have imaginatively and effectively summoned the supernatural to animate tensions embedded in class structure, gender and family dynamics, imperial possessions, science and religion, realism and fantasy, and the permeability of language. Authors studied may include Walter Scott, Joseph Sheridan LeFanu, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, Emily Bronte, Charlotte Riddell, Oscar Wilde, Rudyard Kipling, M. R. James, E. F. Benson, Elizabeth Bowen, Muriel Spark, Graham Greene, A. S. Byatt, and Hilary Mantel.

ENG-318.1   Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop 3 credits

Prerequisites: Permission

This is a writing-intensive course, intended primarily for students who have already taken a 200-level writing workshop. Students are expected to produce a portfolio of original poetry and to engage critically and thoughtfully with their own and other writers' poems.

ENG-319.1   Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop 3 credits

Prerequisites: Permission

This is a writing-intensive course, intended primarily for students who have already taken a 200-level writing workshop. Students are expected to produce a portfolio of original work and to thoughtfully and critically engage with their own and other writers' fiction.

ENG-320.1   Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop 3 credits

Prerequisites: Permission

This is a writing-intensive course, intended primarily for students who have already taken a 200-level writing workshop. Students are expected to produce a portfolio of original work and to thoughtfully and critically engage with their own and other writers' fiction.

ENG-321   African American Literature 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

This course is a survey of the periods and movements of African American literature: early slave narratives, the Harlem Renaissance of the early 20th-century, the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s, and contemporary literature. We study prose, poetry, and drama by authors such as Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, Langston Hughes, Jean Toomer, Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Toni Morrison, and Marilyn Nelson. Along the way, we seek to understand how African Americans have responded through literature to the oppressions of white America - slavery, segregation, violent and institutional racism - as well as how authors forge identity and create community through writing. We examine how these authors respond to their own literary tradition, how they shape form, style and genre in response to their historical context, and how they use writing as resistance, subversion, self-realization and celebration.

ENG-322   Gardens of American Literature 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

Vita Sackville-West once said, "The more one gardens, the more one learns." If this is the case, then a number of American authors must have been very wise individuals, since they were avid gardeners. In this course, we will consider the relationship between gardening, expression, and American literature. We will read a range of texts, including herbaria, records of natural phenomena, and "traditional" literature such as poetry and prose. We will also read scholarship devoted to literature and gardening. Authors may include Nathaniel Hawthorne, Susan Fenimore Cooper, Henry David Thoreau, Emily Dickinson, Celia Thaxter, and Alice Walker.

ENG-326.3   V. S. Naipaul & Salman Rushdie 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

An intensive study of the works of two major authors in postcolonial studies. Originally from the former British colonies and celebrated as Britain's finest contemporary authors, Naipaul and Rushdie are paradoxically housed and unhoused men. Speaking as decentered men, these authors explore and critique the legacies of colonialism and the birth pangs of postcolonial nationhood with force, humor, play, and melancholia, and along the way celebrate cultural confusion, fragmentation, hybridity, the cosmopolitan, and the reclaiming of self.

ENG-326.5   Shakespeare 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

An intensive study of representative poetry and plays from throughout Shakespeare's career, focusing both on the features of Shakespeare's artistry and on the cultural conditions to which that artistry responded.

ENG-326.6   Adrienne Rich 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

An intensive study of the works of one of the major American poets of the last half of the twentieth century and the first part of the twenty-first. The course will chart the progression of Rich's poetry as well as examine some of her works of nonfiction and critical theory, interrogating along the way some of Rich's key conceptualizations of nation, power, and women's sexuality.

ENG-326.7   Hemingway & Faulkner 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T (any version)

This course pairs two literary giants of early 20th-century American modernism: Ernest Hemingway and William Faulkner. Although they lived in the same period and were both enormously influential for later writers in the U.S. and beyond, Hemingway and Faulkner had strongly contrasting prose styles. Studying them together in this course allows readers to understand their common roots in the innovations of modernism and American culture as well as what made their respective innovations radically distinct.

ENG-341   Rival Playwrights: Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

This course will study the three most influential dramatists of the Elizabethan and Jacobean theater, each of whom responded complexly to the example of his predecesssor. In addition to reading some of the plays and poems by each man that respond to, or elicit response from, one of the others, we will also consider the social, theatrical, and literary milieu which made such a convergence of talent possible.

ENG-354   Nineteenth-century British Fiction 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

In the nineteenth century, British fiction experienced a significant florescence.This course will acquaint students with major forms of adult and children's nineteenth-century fiction including domestic realism, adventure-romance, fantasy, the gothic, and naturalism. We will study this literature in the context of nineteenth-century culture, particularly gender relations, perceptions of childhood, the tensions between individual desire and social norms, and the practices of literary production. Assigned texts will include both canonical and non-canonical works. Authors studied will likely include Jane Austen, Anne Bronte, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Joseph Sheridan LeFanu, Robert Louis Stevenson, Lewis Carroll, H. Rider Haggard, Charlotte Yonge, George Gissing, and Thomas Hardy.

ENG-356   Prize Books 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

This course will examine British books in recent decades that have figured prominently in major literary competitions, exploring the role these awards play in shaping literary tastes and publishing trends. Readings will include a number of short-listed and prize-winning books, book reviews, and commentaries on these celebrated contests. Throughout the semester, we will consider the place these books may assume in future assessments and studies of the most influential and significant books of our era. (British Literature after 1789)

ENG-370   Postmodern Literature 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

This course will introduce students to major trends in postmodern fiction, including metafiction, deconstruction, carnival and play, pastiche and intertextuality, post-structuralism, fragmentation, and phenomenology. We will use postmodern philosophies to understand, among other topics, counter-cultural movements such as the cyber and the pop phenomena. Texts assigned may include Scott Pilgrim's Precious Little Life, Hana Yori Dango, Brief Interviews with Hideous Men, and Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World. This course, with its emphasis on postmodern movies and fiction, is especially recommended for serious writers of literary fiction.

ENG-371   The Epic Tradition 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

This course considers how the Iliad, Odyssey, and Aeneid modeled supreme literary achievement in Europe for more than two millennia, and how postclassical European writers wrestled with this daunting, but also inspiring, legacy of classical epic. Postclassical works may include Dante's Inferno, Milton's Paradise Lost, Alexander Pope's mock-epic The Dunciad, James Joyce's Ulysses, and Derek Walcott's Omeros.

ENG-380.10   Ecopoetics 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

This seminar will ask students to consider poets' experimentation with form in response to their understanding and experience of the natural world. How do poets express ecological ideas in poetry. Poets we consider may include Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, William Carlos Williams, Wallace Stevens, Robinson Jeffers, Elizabeth Bishop, Richard Wilbur, Sylvia Plath, Gary Snyder, Seamus Heaney, A.R. Ammons, and Mary Oliver.

ENG-380.2   19th-Century Literature of the British Isles 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

This survey will concentrate primarily on fiction and poetry from the beginnings of Romanticism to fin de siecle decadence and naturalism. Attention will be given to literary texts' power to reflect and shape British culture in the nineteenth century, a period which many observers, including the American Mark Twain, believed experienced more change than any previous century. We will also explore the impact shifting literary tastes and critical approaches have played in texts' and authors' reception and popularity.

ENG-380.4   The American Renaissance 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

This course explores the literary movement that scholars have designated as crucial to the development of a truly "American" literature, focusing roughly on the years 1836 to 1865. In addition to studying canonical authors, students will explore those writers who worked, in the words of one critic, "beneath" the American renaissance, focusing on issues of concern to women, Native Americans, and African Americans. Authors will include Emerson, Frederick Douglass, Margaret Fuller, Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, Whitman, and Lydia Maria Child.

ENG-380.5   Narratives Against Oppression 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

Students will examine how authors from around the world use literature to comment upon, protest, or record various forms of oppression, ranging from dictatorial regimes to cultural divisiveness to colonization and occupation. Such literature is written in order to inspire people to know the world in which they live, and to that end, the course will also deal with contemporary politics and world affairs. Authors studied may include Manil Suri (Death of Vishnu, India), Edward Said (Out of Place, Occupied Palestine), Matthew Kneale (The English Passengers, Tasmania/Australia), V.S. Naipaul (A Way in the World, Trinidad and South America). Videos will include Rabbit-Proof Fence (movie), Palestine is Still the Issue (documentary), and The Soul of India (documentary).

ENG-380.6   The Arthurian Tradition 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

This course will trace the evolution of Arthurian literature from its first flowering in 12th-century European court culture to its influential gathering and retelling in Thomas Malory's Le Morte D'Arthur and its persistent presence in modern literature and culture. Along the way we'll ask what Arthurian literature tells us about medieval conceptions of heroism, aspiration, hierarchy, and failure, and about why a cultural product so quintessentially "medieval" continues to fascinate modern writers. Authors may include Chretien de Troyes, Wolfram von Eschenbach, Thomas Malory, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Mark Twain, and Walker Percy.

ENG-380.7   20th Century Literature of the British Isles 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

A survey of prominent texts of the twenty-first century. Authors studied may include Yeats, Joyce, Woolf, Lawrence, Beckett, Heaney, Muriel Spark, Ian McEwan, and Ali Smith.

ENG-380.8   Postcolonial Authors 3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG-299T

Intensive study of Salman Rushdie's and V.S. Naipaul's works, and their shaping of postcolonial and third-world cultural studies. For additional context, other postcolonial authors may be examined.

ENG-446   Linguistics for Language Teachers 3 credits

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing.

(Same as MFL-446 and EDU-446) A study of the central concepts of linguistic theory. Includes the theoretical areas of pragmatics, semantics, syntax, morphology, and phonology; and the applied areas of language variation, first language acquisition, second language acquisition, and written language. Students will acquire the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) as an essential tool for disciplined examination of linguistic phenomena. Issues of socio-linguistics will be addressed as students wrestle with the relationship between language, thought, and culture, and the nature of the cognitive and brain systems that relate to language learning, language teaching and language use.

ENG-490   Literary Research Practicum 1 credit

Prerequisites: Permission

This course offers serious students of literature the opportunity to gain hands-on experience performing literary research and working with archived materials. Students will be introduced to some of the principles of literary research and, under the guidance of the professor, conduct research using primary materials.

ENG-494   Independent Study 1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites: Permission

A sustained and self-directed study of a particular topic under the guidance of a professor in the department. Independent studies cannot substitute for specific course requirements for the major or minor. See the English Department's and the College's independent study guidelines .

ENG-496   Creative Writing Capstone Seminar 3 credits

Prerequisites: Permission

A cross-genre course for Creative Writing majors in which students will propose and work on independent projects. Creative writers will approach writing and their works as professionals--i.e., thinking long-term beyond the classroom and considering marketing their work. In addition to writing intensively, students will help design the reading list, contextualize their work and writing styles within a literary tradition and genre, and create a community of writers.

ENG-497   Internship 1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites: Permission

Individually arranged internship designed to provide practical editorial and writing experience. An extended analysis of the experience is required and periodic reports may be assigned. See independent study guidelines.

ENG-498   Senior Thesis Seminar in Literature 3 credits

Prerequisites: Permission

A capstone course for senior literature majors designed to help students move toward post-college study. Students will propose, research, write, and revise a senior thesis for formal presentation. In addition, students will research and compose an individualized reading list based on their interests and post-graduate plans. Lists may focus on American, British, or world literature, graduate record exam preparation, or literature ancillary to secondary education teaching.